REAL ESTATE SAN CLEMENTE, REAL ESTATE SAN CLEMENTE HOMES TO BUY, SAN CLEMENTE REAL ESTATE, CA, homes for sale, houses for sale, real estate, mls listings, properties, San Clemente California, San Clemente real estate, San Clemente Homes, San Clemente Homes For Sale, San Clemente properties, San Clemente listings, San Clemente Real Estate,San Clemente homes

Employment-Law-Training-Coarses-HR-Seminars

Get Adobe Flash player


 
Real Estate San Clemente, Orange County - Call Today (949) 933-2266
Homes To Buy In San Clemente, Sell Your House In San Clemente, San Clemente Home Rentals

Ninety percent of all millionaires become so through owning real estate." - Andrew Carnegie
Buy A Home, Sell A Home, Rent A Home, Real Estate, Realtor, Broker, Real Estate Agent, Foreclosure, How To Buy and Sell Real Estate
 

Real Estate
San Clemente
Homes To Buy
.com


"Fantastic Homes
Lead To Great Things!"
Greater Living



VOTED Best
Real Estate Agent
In San Clemente


Pacific Estates
Steve Gallo
Broker / Realtor # 01158013
111 W. Avenida Palizada, Suite G
San Clemente, CA 92672

Steve Gallo Teaches Real Estate
Classes, CE Classes in Real Estate, and Does Real Estate Licence Testing
At The University of San Clemente


CALL US TODAY
(949) 933-2266

To Text Us: "Click Here"



Email:

Find@RealEstate
SanClementeHomesToBuy.com

READ OUR REVIEWS

Read About us On:
GOOGLE
YAHOO
INCREDELICIOUS

RECIPIE FOR LIFE

GREAT ARTICLES:
ARTICLE 1:
Avoid Top 10 Mistakes Made By Real Estate Investors (2,191)
ARTICLE 2:
Do You Need A Real Estate Agent? (1,358)
ARTICLE 3:
Myths About Real Estate Agents (968)
ARTICLE 4:
Baby Boomers Will Drive Real Estate Growth (1,058)
ARTICLE 5:
Strategies For Buying Real Estate In A Slow Market (1,616)
ARTICLE 6:
First-Time Home Buyer Tax Credit (126)
ARTICLE 7:
Tax Benefits on Home Loans (1)
 
ACADEMIC ARTICLES:
ARTICLE 0:
About Real Estate Broker
ARTICLE 1:
About Home Inspections
ARTICLE 2:
About Termites
ARTICLE 3:
About Realtors
ARTICLE 4:
About Dana Point
ARTICLE 5:
About Laguna Beach
ARTICLE 6:
About Mission Viejo
ARTICLE 7:
About Oceanside
ARTICLE 8:
About Orange County
ARTICLE 9:
About Camp Pendleton
ARTICLE 10:
About San Clemente
 

NOTE: The information and notices contained on this website are intended as general research and information and are expressly not intended, and should not be regarded, as medical, financial or legal advice. The articles are from free sources.


Awarded

Best Value in
Weight Loss

Orange County CA, Visit: OrangeCountyCA
BusinessDirectory.com
 
 

"The major fortunes in America have been made in land." - John D. Rockefeller

"The small landholders are the most precious part of a state." - Thomas Jefferson

"Buying real estate is not only the best way, the quickest way, the safest way, but the only way to become wealthy." - Marshall Field

"Real estate cannot be lost or stolen, nor can it be carried away. Purchased with common sense, paid for in full, and managed with reasonable care, it is about the safest investment in the world." - Franklin D. Roosevelt

"The best investment on earth is earth." - Louis Glickman

 

 

.
 

Welcome To
REAL ESTATE SAN CLEMENTE
"We Are Your Friendly and Informative Real Estate Professional!"

Congratulations on your decision to
get serious about Real Estate!


FEATURING: SAN CLEMENTE HOMES FOR SALE

Pacific Estates is dedicated to creating superior real estate experiences for our customers and communities. We provide transparent transactions and services so the customer feels informed and confident throughout the real estate process. We strive to answer all your questions and create positive real estate experience.

A FANTASTIC HOME CAN LEAD TO A GREAT INVESTMENT!



Our Business Principles

We consistently treat everyone with courtesy and respect.

We identify and anticipate the needs of others and
are empowered to take actions that exceed their expectations.

We commited to continuing education for our realtors
so that our customers get the latest and best information.

We are committed to identifying inefficiencies and communicating concerns,
thus enabling us to improve our performance systems.

We conduct ourselves with the highest ethical standards.

We foster a culture where diversity is valued,
quality of life where the customers needs come before our own.



Learn More About A San Clemente Home That is Right For You...

We Specialize in San Clemente. We are a fully licensed real estate brokerage.

CALL US TODAY (949) 933-2266

Understanding
How much home can one afford?

Answers to some basic questions:

Here's the quick rule:
Most people can afford a home that costs up to three times their annual household income. If you have little to no debt and can put 20% down you can probably buy a house worth close to four times your annual income.

What do you do if the inspection turned up significant physical problems with the house? You should have a contract that has the "lender-required repairs" clause on the contracts page, give your bank a copy of the inspection report. They'll tell you what (if anything) has to be fixed before they're willing to loan the money to you to buy the house. If you don't have a good idea of what it will cost to get those things fixed, you'll need to get at least one bid from a contractor to see how much the repairs will cost. If the cost exceeds the amount in the lender-required repairs clause, then the seller will have to make the repairs.

 


REVIEWS & Testimonials:
What People are Saying About Their Real Estate Buying Experience...

"GREAT JOB!"

Thank you for the great job on the sale of our home. You were always there to answer the call and many times the voice of reason. Your marketing strategies were top notch. You also jumped through hoops to find us a rental property during our transition period and worked through a difficult negotiation on the home we finally purchased. It was a tough year, but you stuck by us to the end. We would highly recommend you to anyone selling or purchasing a home. Thanks again for all your efforts.

"GREAT ASSET!"

Nadine and I thought you were a true professional and a great asset to us in our home buying efforts.

"HIGH RECOMMENDATION !"

Eric and I wanted to drop you a note and let you know that we were absolutely thrilled with our first time home buying experience with you. From start to finish, you made the whole process smooth for us, despite numerous obstacles that came up. And when the obstacles did arise, you couldn't have been a better advocate for us. We have mentioned to each other on multiple occasions that you will be the first person we will call when we are ready to buy our next house. And we wouldn't hesitate from recommending you to one of our friends.

Any Questions? Please give us a call: (949) 933-2266

 

 
REAL ESTATE BROKER

A real estate broker or real estate agent is a person who acts as an intermediary between sellers and buyers of real estate/real property and attempts to find sellers who wish to sell and buyers who wish to buy. In the United States, the relationship was originally established by reference to the English common law of agency, with the broker having a fiduciary relationship with his clients.

Estate agent is the term used in the United Kingdom to describe a person or organization whose business is to market real estate on behalf of clients, but there are significant differences between the actions and liabilities of brokers and estate agents in each country. Beyond the United States, other countries take markedly different approaches to the marketing and selling of real property.

In the United States, real estate brokers and their salespersons (commonly called "real estate agents" or, in some states, "brokers") assist sellers in marketing their property and selling it for the highest possible price under the best terms. When acting as a buyer's agent with a signed agreement (or, in many cases, verbal agreement, although a broker may not be legally entitled to his commission unless the agreement is in writing), they assist buyers by helping them purchase property for the lowest possible price under the best terms. The real estate broker "broker" is obligated to provide fiduciary duties to whomever that broker services as client, this agency relationship can become very confusing; if the broker is helping both the buyer and seller, this is called dual agency. Traditionally, the broker represents the seller, and has a fiduciary duty to the seller. If the broker suggests to the buyer that he will help them negotiate the best price, then it is said the broker is practicing undisclosed dual agency, which is unethical and illegal in all states. Under a dual agency transaction it is vital the broker discloses to either/or part whom they represent as client, and whom they represent as customer. A real estate broker owes his client fiduciary duties, those duties include care, confidentiality, loyalty, obedience,accounting & disclosure. A real estate broker owes his customer fair & honest dealing. A real estate broker must request all parties(seller & buyer)sign a dual agency agreement, to protect their license.

In most jurisdictions in the United States, a person must have a license before they may receive remuneration for services rendered as a real estate broker. Unlicensed activity is illegal, but buyers and sellers acting as principals in the sale or purchase of real estate are not required to be licensed. In some states, lawyers are allowed to handle real estate sales for compensation without being licensed as brokers or agents.

The difference between salespersons and brokers

Before the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) was introduced in 1967, when brokers (and their licensees) only represented sellers, the term "real estate salesperson" may have been more appropriate than it is today, given the various ways that brokers and licensees now help buyers through the process rather than merely "selling" them a property. Legally, however, the term "salesperson" is still used in many states to describe a real estate licensee.

Real estate education

To become licensed, most states require that an applicant take a minimum number of classes before taking the state licensing exam. Such education is often provided by real estate brokerages as a means to finding new agents.

In many states, the real estate licensee (acting as an agent of a broker) must disclose to prospective buyers and sellers who represents whom. See below for a broker/licensee relationship to sellers and their relationship to buyers.

While some people may refer to any licensed real estate agent as a real estate broker, a licensed real estate agent is a professional who has obtained a real estate broker's license. The licensee is one who has obtained a real estate license and is employed by a real estate broker. Often, licensee's refer to themselves as an "agent", but the true agent is the broker and the licensee is a representative of the broker, often referred to as the real estate "salesperson." A real estate broker who works for another broker is referred to, sometimes, as a junior broker.

In the United States, there are commonly two levels of real estate professionals licensed by the individual states, but not by the federal government:

Real estate salesperson (or, in some states, Real estate broker):

When a person first becomes licensed to become a real estate agent, they obtain a real estate salesperson's license (some states use the term, "broker") from the state in which they will practice. To obtain a real estate license, the candidate must take specific coursework (of between 40 and 90 hours) and pass a state exam on real estate law and practice. To work, salespersons must be associated with (and act under the authority of) a real estate broker. In Delaware for example, the licensing course requires the candidate to take 99 classroom hours in order to qualify to sit for the state and national examination. In each successive year thereafter, the license holder must participate in continuing education in order to remain abreast of state and national changes.

Many states also have reciprocal agreements with other states, allowing a licensed individual from a qualified state to take the second state's exam without completing the course requirements, or, in some cases, take only a state law exam.

Real estate broker (or, in some states, qualifying broker):

After gaining some years of experience in real estate sales, a salesperson may decide to become licensed as a real estate broker (or Principal/qualifying broker) in order to own, manage or operate their own brokerage. In addition, some states allow college graduates to apply for a broker license without years of experience. College graduates fall into this category once they have completed the state required courses as well. California allows licensed attorneys to become brokers upon passing the broker exam, without having to take the requisite courses required of agent. Commonly more course work and a broker's state exam on real estate law must be passed. Upon obtaining a broker's license, a real estate agent may continue to work for another broker in a similar capacity as before (often referred to as a broker associate or associate broker) or take charge of his/her own brokerage and hire other salespersons (or broker) licensees. Becoming a branch office manager may or may not require a broker's license. Some states such as New York allow licensed attorneys to become real estate brokers without taking any exam. In some states, such as Colorado, there are no "salespeople", as all licensees are brokers.

In the United States, a Realtor (capitalized) is a registered trademark of the National Association of Realtors (NAR). There are 1.3 million Realtors, mostly in the United States, and an additional 1 million licensed real estate agents who are not members of NAR and cannot use the trademark "realtor". However, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics claims only about 600,000 working brokers/salespersons.

Agency relationships with clients versus non-agency relationships with customers

  • Relationship: Conventionally, the broker provides a conventional full-service, commission-based brokerage relationship under a signed listing agreement with a seller or "buyer representation" agreement with a buyer, thus creating under common law in most states an agency relationship with fiduciary obligations. The seller or buyer is then a client of the broker. Some states also have statutes that define and control the nature of the representation.

Agency relationships in residential real estate transactions involve the legal representation by a real estate broker (on behalf of a real estate company) of the principal, whether that person or persons is a buyer or a seller. The broker (and his/her licensed real estate agents) then becomes the agent of the principal.

  • Non-agency relationship: where no written agreement nor fiduciary relationship exists, a real estate broker (and his agents) works with a principal who is then known as the broker's customer. When a buyer, who has not entered into a Buyer Agency agreement with the broker, buys a property, then that broker functions as the sub-agent of the seller's broker. When a seller chooses to work with a transaction broker, there is no agency relationship created.

Transaction brokers

Some state Real Estate Commissions, notably Florida's after 1992 (and extended in 2003) and Colorado's after 1994 (with changes in 2003), created the option of having no agency nor fiduciary relationship between brokers and sellers or buyers. Having no more than a facilitator relationship, transaction brokers assists buyers, sellers, or both during the transaction without representing the interests of either party who may then be regarded as customers.

As noted by the South Broward Board of Realtors, Inc. in a letter to State of Florida legislative committees:

"The Transaction Broker crafts a transaction by bringing a willing buyer and a willing seller together and assists with the closing of details. The Transaction Broker is not a fiduciary of any party, but must abide by law as well as professional and ethical standards." (such as NAR Code of Ethics)

The result was that in 2003, Florida created a system where the default brokerage relationship had "all licensees ... operating as transaction brokers, unless a single agent or no brokerage relationship is established, in writing, with the customer" and the statute required written disclosure of the transaction brokerage relationship to the buyer or seller customer only through July 1, 2008.

In both Florida and Colorado's case, dual agency and sub-agency (where both listing and selling agents represented the seller) no longer exist.

Dual or limited agency

Dual agency occurs when the same brokerage represents both the seller and the buyer under written agreements. Individual state laws vary and interpret dual agency rather differently.

Many states no longer allow dual agency. Instead, "transaction brokerage" provides the buyer and seller with a limited form of representation, but without any fiduciary obligations (see Florida law). Buyers and sellers are generally advised to consult a licensed real estate professional for a written definition of an individual state's laws of agency, and many states require written Disclosures to be signed by all parties outlining the duties and obligations.

  • If state law allows for the same agent to represent both the buyer and the seller in a single transaction, the brokerage/agent is typically considered to be a Dual Agent. Special laws/rules often apply to dual agents, especially in negotiating price.
  • In some states, Dual Agency can be practiced in situations where the same brokerage (but not agent) represent both the buyer and the seller. If one agent from the brokerage has a home listed and another agent from that brokerage has a buyer-brokerage agreement with a buyer who wishes to buy the listed property, Dual Agency occurs by allowing each agent to be designated as "intra-company" agent. Only the broker himself is the Dual Agent.
  • Some states do allow a broker and one agent to represent both sides of the transaction as dual agents. In those situations, conflict of interest is more likely to occur, typically resulting in the loss of advocacy for both parties.

Types of services that a broker can provide

Since each province and state's laws may differ from others, it is generally advised that prospective sellers or buyers consult a licensed real estate professional.

Some examples:

  • Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) — an estimate of the home's value compared with others. This differs from an appraisal in that property currently for sale may be taken into consideration. (competition for the subject property)
  • Exposure — Marketing the real property to prospective buyers.
  • Facilitating a Purchase — guiding a buyer through the process.
  • Facilitating a Sale — guiding a seller through the selling process.
  • FSBO document preparation — preparing necessary paperwork for "For Sale By Owner" sellers.
  • Real estate appraisal — but only, in most states, if the broker is also licensed as an appraiser.
  • Home Selling Kits — guides to how to market and sell a property.
  • Hourly Consulting for a fee, based on the client's needs.
  • Leasing for a fee or percentage of the gross lease value.
  • Property Management
  • Exchanging property.
  • Auctioning property.
  • Preparing contracts and leases. (not in all states)

These services are also changing as a variety of real estate trends transform the industry.

General

The sellers and buyers themselves are the principals in the sale, and real estate brokers (and the broker's agents) are their agents as defined in the law. However, although a real estate agent commonly fills out the real estate contract form, agents are typically not given power of attorney to sign the real estate contract or the deed; the principals sign these documents. The respective real estate agents may include their brokerages on the contract as the agents for each principal.

The use of a real estate broker is not a requirement for the sale or conveyance of real estate or for obtaining a mortgage loan from a lender. However, once a broker is used, the settlement attorney (or party handling closing) will ensure that all parties involved be paid. Lenders typically have other requirements, though, for a loan.

Services provided to both buyers and sellers

In addition to the services to sellers and buyers described below, most real estate agents coordinate various aspects of the closing.

Real estate brokers (and their agents) typically do not provide title service such as title search or title insurance, do not conduct surveys or formal appraisals of the property such as those required by lenders, and do not act as lawyers for the parties, although they may "coordinate" these activities with the appropriate specialists. Some real estate brokers may be associated with loan officers who may help to finance buyers to make their purchase.

Real Estate Agents can provide buyer representation, seller representation, and sometimes dual agency representation (in some states). Regardless of whether a real estate agent assists sellers or buyers of real estate, negotiating skills and knowledge of financing options are important.

Real estate brokers and sellers

Services provided to seller as client

Upon signing a listing contract with the seller wishing to sell the real estate, the brokerage attempts to earn a commission by finding a buyer for the sellers' property for highest possible price on the best terms for the seller. In Canada, most provinces' laws require the real estate agent to forward all written offers to the seller for consideration or review.

To help accomplish this goal of finding buyers, a real estate agency commonly does the following:

  • Listing the property for sale to the public, often on an MLS, in addition to any other methods.
  • Based on the law in several states, providing the seller with a real property condition disclosure form, and other forms that may be needed.
  • Preparing necessary papers describing the property for advertising, pamphlets, open houses, etc.
  • Generally placing a "For Sale" sign on the property indicating how to contact the real estate office and agent.
  • Advertising the property. Advertising is often the biggest outside expense in listing a property.
  • In some cases, holding an open house to show the property.
  • Being a contact person available to answer any questions about the property and to schedule showing appointments
  • Ensuring buyers are prescreened so that they are financially qualified to buy the property; the more highly financially qualified the buyer is, the more likely the closing will succeed.
  • Negotiating price on behalf of the sellers. The seller's agent acts as a fiduciary for the seller. This may involve preparing a standard real estate purchase contract by filling in the blanks in the contract form.
  • In some cases, holding an earnest payment cheque in escrow from the buyer(s) until the closing. In many states, the closing is the meeting between the buyer and seller where the property is transferred and the title is conveyed by a deed. In other states, especially those in the West, closings take place during a defined escrow period when buyers and sellers each sign the appropriate papers transferring title, but do not meet each other.

The "listing" contract

Several types of listing contracts exist between broker and seller. These may be defined as:

  • Exclusive right to sell

In this type of agreement, the broker is given the exclusive right to market the property and represents the seller exclusively. This is referred to as seller agency. However, the brokerage also offers to co-operate with other brokers and agrees to allow them to show the property to prospective buyers and offers a share of the total real estate commission.

  • Exclusive agency

An alternative form, "exclusive agency", allows only the broker the right to sell the property, and no offer of compensation is ever made to another broker. In that case, the property will never be entered into an MLS. Naturally, that limits the exposure of the property to only one agency.

  • Open listing

This is an agreement whereby the property is available for sale by any real estate professional who can advertise, show, or negotiate the sale. Whoever first brings an acceptable offer would receive compensation. Real estate companies will typically require that a written agreement for an open listing be signed by the seller to ensure the payment of a commission if a sale should take place.

Although there can be other ways of doing business, a real estate brokerage usually earns its commission after the real estate broker and a seller enter into a listing contract and fulfill agreed-upon terms specified within that contract. The seller's real estate is then listed for sale, frequently with property data entered into an MLS in addition to any other ways of advertising or promoting the sale of the property.

In most of North America, where brokers are members of a national association (such as NAR in the United States or the Canadian Real Estate Association), a listing agreement or contract between broker and seller must include the following: starting and ending dates of the agreement; the price at which the property will be offered for sale; the amount of compensation due to the broker and how much, if any, will be offered to a co-operating broker who may bring a buyer. Without an offer of compensation to a co-operating broker (co-op percentage or flat fee), the property may not be advertised in the MLS system.

Net listings: Property listings at an agreed-upon net price that the seller wishes to receive with any excess going to the broker as commission are not legal in most, if not all, states.

Brokerage commissions

In consideration of the brokerage successfully finding a satisfactory buyer for the property, a broker anticipates receiving a commission for the services the brokerage has provided. Usually, the payment of a commission to the brokerage is contingent upon finding a satisfactory buyer for the real estate for sale, the successful negotiation of a purchase contract between a satisfactory buyer and seller, or the settlement of the transaction and the exchange of money between buyer and seller. The median real estate commission charged to the seller by the listing (seller's) agent is 6% of the purchase price. Typically, this commission is split evenly between the seller's and buyer's agents, with the buyer's agent generally receiving a commission of 3% of the purchase price of the home sold.

In North America commissions on real estate transactions are negotiable. Local real estate sales activity usually dictates the amount of commission agreed to. Real estate commission is typically paid by the seller at the closing of the transaction as detailed in the listing agreement.

RESPA

Real estate brokers who work with lenders may not receive any compensation from the lender for referring a residential client to a specific lender. To do so would be a violation of a United States federal law known as the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA). Commercial transactions are exempt from RESPA. All lender compensation to a broker must be disclosed to all parties. A commission may also be paid during negotiation of contract base on seller and agent.

Lockbox

With the sellers' permission, a lockbox is placed on homes that are occupied and, after arranging an appointment with the home owner, agents can show the home. When a property is vacant or where a seller may be living elsewhere, a lockbox will generally be placed on the front door. The listing broker helps arrange showings of the property by various real estate agents from all companies associated with the MLS.

The lockbox contains the key to the door of the property and the box can only be opened by licensed real estate agents (often only with authorization from the listing brokerage), by using some sort of secret combination or code provided by the brokerage or the issuer of the lockbox.

Shared commissions with co-op brokers

If any buyer's broker (or any of his/her agents) brings the buyer for the property, the buyer's broker would typically be compensated with a co-op commission coming from the total offered to the listing broker, often about half of the full commission from the seller. If an agent or salesperson working for the buyer's broker brings the buyer for the property, then the buyer's broker would commonly compensate his agent with a fraction of the co-op commission, again as determined in a separate agreement. A discount brokerage may offer a reduced commission in the event no other brokerage firm is involved and no co-op commission is paid out.

If there is no co-commission to pay to another brokerage, the listing brokerage receives the full amount of the commission minus any other types of expenses.

Potential points of contention for agents

Controversy exists around how commissions paid to real estate agents are disclosed to buyers and the effect additional seller incentives may have on the negotiation process and final purchase price.

If a listing agent sells a property above the listed price, they make additional income. In theory, this motivates them to get top dollar for the seller. However, if an agent representing a buyer obtains a lower sales price for their client, then they make a lower commission. Thus, it could be considered to be in the agent's best interest to advise his client to purchase the property at a higher price.

Another potential conflict of interest exists when a listing agent in a very active real estate market sells properties quickly at low prices to benefit from high sales volume.

Real estate brokers and buyers

Services provided to buyers

  • Buyers as clients

With the increase in the practice of buyer brokerage in the United States, especially since the late 1990s in most states, agents (acting under their brokers) have been able to represent buyers in the transaction with a written "Buyer Agency Agreement" not unlike the "Listing Agreement" for sellers referred to above. In this case, buyers are clients of the brokerage.

Some brokerages represent buyers only and are known as exclusive buyer agents (EBAs). Consumer Reports states, "You can find a true buyer's agent only at a firm that does not accept listings." The advantages of using an Exclusive Buyer Agent is that they avoid conflicts of interest by working in the best interests of the buyer and not the seller, avoid homes and neighborhoods likely to fare poorly in the marketplace, ensure the buyer does not unknowingly overpay for a property, fully informs the buyer of adverse conditions, encourages the buyer to make offers based on true value instead of list price, which can sometimes be overstated, and works to save the buyer money. A buyer agency firm commissioned a study that found EBA purchased homes were seventeen times less likely to go into foreclosure.

A real estate brokerage attempts to do the following for the buyers of real estate only when they represent the buyers with some form of written buyer-brokerage agreement:

  • Find real estate in accordance with the buyers needs, specifications, and cost.
  • Takes buyers to and shows them properties available for sale.
  • When deemed appropriate, prescreens buyers to ensure they are financially qualified to buy the properties shown (or uses a mortgage professional, such a bank's mortgage specialist or alternatively a Mortgage broker, to do that task).
  • Negotiates price and terms on behalf of the buyers and prepares standard real estate purchase contract by filling in the blanks in the contract form. The buyer's agent acts as a fiduciary for the buyer.

Due to the importance of the role of representing buyers' interests, many brokers who seek to play the role of client advocate are now seeking out the services of Certified Mortgage Planners, industry experts that work in concert with Certified Financial Planners to align consumers' home finance positions with their larger financial portfolio(s).

  • Buyers as customers

In most states, until the 1990s, buyers who worked with an agent of a real estate broker in finding a house were customers of the brokerage, since the broker represented only sellers.

Today, state laws differ. Buyers and/or sellers may be represented. Typically, a written "Buyer Brokerage" agreement is required for the buyer to have representation (regardless of which party is paying the commission), although by his/her actions, an agent can create representation.

  • Find real estate in accordance with the buyers' needs, specifications, and affordability.
  • Take buyers to and shows them properties available for sale.
  • When deemed appropriate, prescreen buyers to ensure they are financially qualified to buy the properties shown (or uses a mortgage professional to do that task).
  • Assist the buyer in making an offer for the property.

The impact of globalization on real estate brokers' activities

Globalization has had an immediate and powerful impact on real estate markets, making them an international working place. The rapid growth of the Internet has made the international market accessible to millions of consumers. A look at recent changes in homeownership rates illustrates this. Minority homeownership jumped by 4.4 million during the 1990s, reaching 12.5 million in 2000, according to the Fannie Mae Foundation. Foreign direct investment in U.S. real estate has increased sharply from $38 billion in 1997 more than $50 billion in 2002 according to U.S. 2000 Census data.

Most local real estate agents view the foreign market as a significant revenue potential and may have already worked with international clients in their local market, new immigrants or more sophisticated investors from different cultures and from other countries. For example, they provide value-added services that help overseas relocation employees figure out which inoculations their children need and how to register a car in the United States. Real estate brokers want to keep central to the transaction, protect the best interests of their members and address the unique needs of each multicultural global client by acquiring specialized training and designations. (See below for more)

In 2007 the Mexican Association of Real Estate Professionals in Mexico, AMPI, and the NAR, National Association of Realtors in the United States, signed a bilateral contract for international real estate business cooperation. Also at the local level, many other state and local associations are helping other countries achieve the same result. For instance, in New Mexico, a historically multicultural state, under the RANM, Realtor Association of New Mexico and the President's Advisory Council, is looking into forming an ambassador association to help a foreign country into signing a bilateral agreement with the NAR. In New Mexico, there are 4500 licensed real estate professionals and only 14 or 15 CIPS designees, out of whom, only six speak a language other than English.

A "Management Guide For Real Estate Associations" exists, which is a publication of the International Real Property Foundation (IRPF), which was funded by the National Association of Realtors (NAR) and the Reaume Foundation.The IRPF, in its Web site, regarding The Caux Round Table (CRT) principles, states that: "Ethical perceptions and international business is highly influenced by cultural differences. Because of cultural and ethical relativism, real estate business that is conducted across national boundaries may discover ethical conflicts. Major ethical issues that complicate international business activities include sexual and racial discrimination, price discrimination, bribery, harmful products, and telecommunications (enforcement of country-specific laws, copyrights, and questionable financial activities). A good document for reference in developing an association Code of Ethics in conjunction with such principles is "The Caux Round Table Business Principles of Ethics" (1995) (www.cauxroundtable.org).

Because of the particularities and the nature of international transactions between real estate agents of different countries, the Real Estate Code of Ethics of each country are excellent to regulate the ethics of each member in its own jurisdiction, but in the case of complex international real estate transactions were sometimes ethical conflicts arise, there is a need to have a group of principles more adjusted to international transactions were two or more real estate agents of different countries participate in real estate brokerage businesses. For example, in the NAR-FECEPAC memorandum of understanding of February 2003, a commitment was set to promote and adopt the respective code of ethics,standards and norms, but there is nothing specific mentioned for complex ethical matters in international transactions. There was surely a commitment to cooperate with a foreign agent to work in local markets different from the foreign agents market. As an example, it can be noticed that the NAR-CSBR Bilateral Cooperation Agreement of November 12, 2001 also created a commitment to promote and enforce mutually acceptable codes of ethics (Code of Ethics meaning those that been promulgated by the cooperating associations for use in their respective countries, each of which is acknowledged to be acceptable to the other). Again, as the IRPF says "Ethical perceptions and international business is highly influenced by cultural differences. Because of cultural and ethical relativism, real estate business that is conducted across national boundaries may discover ethical conflicts". There is also nothing specific mentioned for complex ethical matters in international transactions, whilst the agreements do provide to seek to facilitate business opportunities for members of the cooperating associations who may be working in each others markets, and also initiating and hosting trade missions. The bilateral agreement between NAR and CSBR also states that both parties agree to enforce their respective codes and advice the other of subsequent modifications to its code of ethics.

Some association members of Central American Real Estate Associations who are practicing agents and are involved in real life transactions on a daily basis have expressed their concern in the sense that at the moment of ethical conflicts with foreign colleagues, they have not had at hand any practical instrument that can serve to resolve ethical conflicts (even though agreements that make reference to code of ethics do exist).

Because the Caux Round Table principles are designed by corporate leaders and provide a model of how a good corporate citizen behaves in the countries and markets where it penetrates being a foreign entity, this principles could serve to reduce the fear of local brokers to foreign competition, provide an ethical framework against asymmetry of participants in free trade of services in our industry, and will permit that Central American association members that see an advantage in opening their country markets to competition, and that see advantages in having foreign strategic partners to work our their own local markets (e.g.: local Central American brokers partnering with United States brokers to work Central American Markets), keep promoting competition, globalization of business, and free trade of services.

Education

A person may attend a pre-license course lasting 60 hours and then be tested by the state for a real estate agent's license. Upon passing, the new licensee must place their license with an established real estate firm, managed by a broker. Requirements vary by state but after some period of time working as an agent, one may return to the classroom and test to become a broker. For example, California and Florida require you to have a minimum experience of two years as a full-time licensed agent within the prior 5 years. Where as Indiana only requires one year experience as a real estate salesperson and Arizona requires three out of the prior five years. Brokers may manage or own firms. Each branch office of a larger real estate firm must be managed by a broker.

States issue licenses for a multi year period and require real estate agents and brokers to complete continuing education prior to renewing their licenses. Many states recognize licenses from other states and issue licenses upon request to existing agents and firms upon request without additional education or testing however the license must be granted before real estate service is provided in the state.

California does not have license reciprocity with other states. An applicant for licensure is not, however, required to be a resident of California to obtain a license.

Organizations

Several notable groups exist to promote the industry and to assist members who are in it.

The National Association of Realtors (NAR) is the largest real estate organization and one of the largest trade groups anywhere. Their membership exceeds one million. NAR also has state chapters as well as thousands of local chapters. Upon joining a local chapter, a new member is automatically enrolled into the state and national organizations. When the principals of a firm join, all licensed agents in that firm must also belong. An advantage of membership is access to the local MLS (sometimes county-wide, sometimes broader in coverage) which exists for the benefit of members and which provides access following the payment of additional dues to the local system.

The Realtor Political Action Committee (RPAC) is a separate entity, and also the lobbying arm of NAR. In 2005, they were considered the largest PAC in the United States. According to realtor.org, RPAC is the largest contributor of direct contributions to federal candidates.

The National Association of Exclusive Buyer Agents is a group of agents and brokers who work in firms that represent buyers only. They assist in locating exclusive buyer agents for home buyers through the Web site www.naeba.org.

The National Association of Real Estate Brokers (NAREB) was founded in 1947 as an alternative for African Americans who were excluded from the dominant NAR. Both groups allow members to join without regard to race. However, NAREB has historically been an African American-centric group with a focus on developing housing resources for intercity populations.

Changing industry

Compensation is conventionally based on a percentage of the sales price, split between the buying and selling brokers, and then between the agent(s) and his/her real estate agency. While a split based on the percentage received by the broker is generally normal, in some brokerages agents may pay a monthly "desk fee" for office costs, monthly fee, etc., and then retain 100% of the commission received.

 
ABOUT ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA

Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. Its county seat is Santa Ana. According to the 2000 Census, its population was 2,846,289, making it the second most populous county in the state of California, and the fifth most populous in the United States. The state of California estimates its population as of 2007 to be 3,098,121 people, dropping its rank to third, behind San Diego County. Thirty-four incorporated cities are located in Orange County; the newest is Aliso Viejo.

Unlike many other large centers of population in the United States, Orange County uses its county name as its source of identification whereas other places in the country are identified by the large city that is closest to them. This is because there is no defined center to Orange County like there is in other areas which have one distinct large city. Five Orange County cities have populations exceeding 170,000 while no cities in the county have populations surpassing 360,000. Seven of these cities are among the 200 largest cities in the United States.

Orange County is also famous as a tourist destination, as the county is home to such attractions as Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm, as well as sandy beaches for swimming and surfing, yacht harbors for sailing and pleasure boating, and extensive area devoted to parks and open space for golf, tennis, hiking, kayaking, cycling, skateboarding, and other outdoor recreation. It is at the center of Southern California's Tech Coast, with Irvine being the primary business hub.

The average price of a home in Orange County is $541,000. Orange County is the home of a vast number of major industries and service organizations. As an integral part of the second largest market in America, this highly diversified region has become a Mecca for talented individuals in virtually every field imaginable. Indeed the colorful pageant of human history continues to unfold here; for perhaps in no other place on earth is there an environment more conducive to innovative thinking, creativity and growth than this exciting, sun bathed valley stretching between the mountains and the sea in Orange County.

Orange County was Created March 11 1889, from part of Los Angeles County, and, according to tradition, so named because of the flourishing orange culture. Orange, however, was and is a commonplace name in the United States, used originally in honor of the Prince of Orange, son-in-law of King George II of England.

Incorporated: March 11, 1889
Legislative Districts:
* Congressional: 38th-40th, 42nd & 43
* California Senate: 31st-33rd, 35th & 37
* California Assembly: 58th, 64th, 67th, 69th, 72nd & 74

County Seat: Santa Ana
County Information:
Robert E. Thomas Hall of Administration
10 Civic Center Plaza, 3rd Floor, Santa Ana 92701
Telephone: (714)834-2345 Fax: (714)834-3098
County Government Website: http://www.oc.ca.gov

CITIES OF ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA:

City of Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698
City of Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899
City of Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823
City of Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624
City of Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628
City of Cypress, 90630
City of Dana Point, 92624, 92629
City of Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728
City of Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838
City of Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846
City of Huntington Beach, 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649
City of Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710
City of La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633
City of La Palma, 90623
City of Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698
City of Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656
City of Laguna Niguel
, 92607, 92677
City of Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654
City of Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, 92610
City of Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721
City of Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694
City of Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663
City of Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869
City of Placentia, 92870, 92871
City of Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, 92679
City of San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674
City of San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694
City of Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799
City of Seal Beach, 90740
City of Stanton, 90680
City of Tustin, 92780, 92781, 92782
City of Villa Park, 92861, 92867
City of Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685
City of Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

Noteworthy communities Some of the communities that exist within city limits are listed below: * Anaheim Hills, Anaheim * Balboa Island, Newport Beach * Corona del Mar, Newport Beach * Crystal Cove / Pelican Hill, Newport Beach * Capistrano Beach, Dana Point * El Modena, Orange * French Park, Santa Ana * Floral Park, Santa Ana * Foothill Ranch, Lake Forest * Monarch Beach, Dana Point * Nellie Gail, Laguna Hills * Northwood, Irvine * Woodbridge, Irvine * Newport Coast, Newport Beach * Olive, Orange * Portola Hills, Lake Forest * San Joaquin Hills, Laguna Niguel * San Joaquin Hills, Newport Beach * Santa Ana Heights, Newport Beach * Tustin Ranch, Tustin * Talega, San Clemente * West Garden Grove, Garden Grove * Yorba Hills, Yorba Linda * Mesa Verde, Costa Mesa

Unincorporated communities These communities are outside of the city limits in unincorporated county territory: * Coto de Caza * El Modena * Ladera Ranch * Las Flores * Midway City * Orange Park Acres * Rossmoor * Silverado Canyon * Sunset Beach * Surfside * Trabuco Canyon * Tustin Foothills

Adjacent counties to Orange County Are: * Los Angeles County, California - north, west * San Bernardino County, California - northeast * Riverside County, California - east * San Diego County, California - southeast



 
ABOUT SAN CLEMENTE, ORANGE COUNTY, CALFIORNIA


San Clemente is a city in Orange County, California, United States. As of 2005, the city population was 65,338. Located six miles south of San Juan Capistrano at the southern tip of the county, it is roughly equidistant from San Diego and Los Angeles. The north entrance to Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton (known as the "Christianitos Gate") is located in San Clemente.

HISTORY
Prior to the arrival of the Spanish, the area was inhabited by what came to be known as the Juaneño Indians. After the founding of Mission San Juan Capistrano, the local natives were conscripted to work for the mission. The city of San Clemente was founded in 1925 by real estate developer (and former mayor of Seattle) Ole Hanson who named it San Clemente after a town in Spain. As it were, San Clemente Island was named after the city later since it is directly west of the coast. Hanson envisioned it as a Spanish-style coastal resort town, a "Spanish Village by the Sea." In an unprecedented move, he had a clause added to the deeds requiring all building plans to be submitted to an architectural review board in an effort to ensure that future development would retain some Spanish-style influence (for example, for many years it was required that all new buildings in the downtown area have red tile roofs). It was incorporated in 1928 with a council-manager government.

Nixon's "Western White House" In 1968 President Richard Nixon bought the H. H. Cotton estate, one of the original homes built by one of Hanson's partners. Nixon called it "La Casa Pacifica," but it was nicknamed the "Western White House", a term now commonly used for a President's vacation home. It sits above one of the West Coast's premier surfing spots, Trestles, and just north of historic surfing beach San Onofre. During Nixon's tenure it was visited by many world leaders , including Soviet Premier Leonid Brezhnev, Mexican President Gustavo Díaz Ordaz, Japanese Prime Minister Eisaku Sato, and Henry Kissinger, as well as businessman Bebe Rebozo. Following his resignation, Nixon retired to San Clemente to write his memoirs. He later sold the home and moved to Park Ridge, New Jersey. The property also has historical tie to the democratic side of the aisle; prior to Nixon's tenure at the estate, H.H. Cotton was known to host Franklin D. Roosevelt, who would visit to play cards in a small outbuilding overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

Surfing legacy San Clemente catches swells all year long. Going from South to North, they include Trestles (technically just south of the city line), North Gate, State Park, Riviera, Lasuen, The Hole, Beach House, T-Street, The Pier, 204, North Beach, and Poche. San Clemente is also the surfing media capital of the world as well as a premier surfing destination. It is home to Surfing Magazine, The Surfer's Journal, and Longboard Magazine, with Surfer Magazine just up the freeway in San Juan Capistrano. The city has a large concentration of surfboard shapers and manufacturers. Additionally, many world renowned surfers were raised in San Clemente or took up long-term residence in town, including Hobie Alter, Jr., Shane Beschen, Gavin Beschen, Matt Archbold, Christian Fletcher, Mike Parsons (originally from Laguna Beach), Colin McPhillips, Rocky Sabo, Colleen Mehlberg, Greg Long, Dino Andino, Chris Ward, and many, many others. San Clemente High School has won 6 out of 7 most recent NSSA national surfing titles.

Education The city is served by Capistrano Unified School District. Within the city, there are 5 elementary schools, 3 middle schools, and 1 high school. Elementary Schools: Concordia Elementary, Truman Benedict, Vista Del Mar, Las Palmas, and Lobo Elementary. Middle Schools: Bernice Ayer, Shorecliffs, and Vista Del Mar. High Schools: San Clemente High San Clemente High School is the only high school in San Clemente. Ranked in the top 1.3% of schools nationwide, San Clemente also has an IB (International Baccalaureate) Program, a vast number of AP Courses. The music program also boasts a nationally recognized Vocal Arts Program with award-winning Madrigals, Women's Ensemble, and A Cappella choirs. San Clemente's IB students rank in the top 3% of the World for their IB scores and the program has expanded vastly in the past few years under the direction of Patrick Harris and Kathleen Sigafoos, the IB Coordinators of the School.

* City of San Clemente official website
* The San Clemente Sun Post News, the town's oldest newspaper
* San Clemente Times community newspaper

 
ABOUT CAMP PENDLETON

Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton is the major West Coast base of the United States Marine Corps and serves as its prime amphibious training base. It is located in Southern California between the cities of Oceanside and San Clemente. The base was established in 1942 to train U.S. Marines for service in World War II. It is named after Marine General Joseph Henry Pendleton, who long advocated setting up a West Coast training base for the Marine Corps. Today it is the home to a myriad of Fleet Marine Force units including the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force and various training commands.

The base's diverse geography, spanning over 125,000 acres (506 km²), plays host to year round training for Marines in addition to all other branches of the U.S. military. Amphibious and sea-to-shore training takes place at several key points along the base's 17 miles (27 km) of coastline. The main base is in the Mainside Complex, at the southeastern end of the base, and the remote northern interior is an impact area. Daytime population is around 100,000. Recruits from nearby Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego spend a month on Pendleton's Edson Range receiving field training, and after graduating from boot camp return to the base's School of Infantry for further training. Camp Pendleton remains the last major undeveloped portion of the Southern California coastline, save for a few small state parks. In this way, it acts as a kind of buffer between Orange County, which is generally considered part of the Greater Los Angeles Area, and San Diego County, which generally is not.

Camp Pendleton is located in Oceanside which is the third largest city in San Diego County, California. The city has a population of 173,303. Together with Vista and Carlsbad, it makes up the Tri-City area. The city is just south of U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, the busiest military base in the United States. Oceanside has grown massively from the 1970 census report of 45,000 people. Much of the city area was developed into single-family home tracts when real estate booms took place in the 1970s and 1980s. Since 1990, more commercial and industrial development diversified Oceanside's economic base, with another population boom ever since. According to the US census, Oceanside's continual growth will put the city population estimates above the 200,000 mark in 2010 or exceed 250,000 by the year

 

"An honest answer is the sign of true friendship."

We receive many customers from across the world including people from the following cities:

Aliso Viejo 92656, 92698, Anaheim 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Atwood, 92811, Brea, 92821, 92822,92823, Buena Park, 90620 ,90621,90622, 90624, Capistrano Beach, 92624, Corona del Mar, 92625, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Dana Point, 92629, East Irvine, 92650, El Toro, 92609, Foothill Ranch, 92610, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843 ,92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach , 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92617, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92697, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Ladera Ranch, 92694, Laguna Beach , 92651, 92652, Laguna Hills ,92653, 92654,92607,92677, Laguna Woods, 92637, Lake Forest, 92630, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Midway City, 92655, Mission Viejo, 92690, 92691, 92692,Newport Beach , 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, 92657,
Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia, 92870, 92871, Rancho Santa Margarita 92688, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92693,
Santa Ana , 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705 ,92706, 92707, 92711, 92712, 92725.92735, 92799, Seal Beach , 90740, Silverado 92676, Stanton, 90680, Sunset Beach 90742, Surfside 90743, Trabuco Canyon, 92678, 92679,Tustin ,92780, 92781,92782, Villa Park, 92861,Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

This Business was Awarded
Best Real Estate in San Clemente

Orange County CA, Visit: OrangeCountyCABusinessDirectory.com


REAL ESTATE SAN CLEMENTE
Call (949) 933-2266



Website: RealEstateSanClementeHomesToBuy.com

Our EMAIL: Find@RealEstateSanClementeHomesToBuy.com

(c) 2013 Real Estate San Clemente Homes To Buy, 111 W. Avenida Palizada, Suite B, San Clemente, CA 92762


REAL ESTATE SAN CLEMENTE, REAL ESTATE SAN CLEMENTE HOMES TO BUY, SAN CLEMENTE REAL ESTATE, CA, homes for sale, houses for sale, real estate, mls listings, properties, San Clemente California, San Clemente real estate, San Clemente Homes, San Clemente Homes For Sale, San Clemente properties, San Clemente listings, San Clemente Real Estate,San Clemente homes for sale,San Clemente condos for sale,San Clemente Realtor


DANA POINT, CAMP PENDLETON, SAN CLEMENTE,
VOTED BEST REALTOR IN SAN CLEMENTE! REAL ESTATE IN SAN CLEMENTE
REAL ESTATE SAN CLEMENTE